Tips for Traveling with Animal Allergy

It is estimated that 53 percent of travelers take their pets on trips. On the other hand, 30 percent of Americans have pet allergies. If you have a cat or dog allergy, your body’s immune system reacts to proteins in the pets’ urine, saliva or dander. Animal allergies may sound trivial but can be both mild and fatal depending on the victim. It is important to know how to minimize the symptoms to have an enjoyable flight.

Do Not Underestimate the Threat

If you are on a flight, do not take chances with allergies as medical emergencies in the skies are the last thing you need. Plan your trip with your doctor to get the necessary advice to ensure that you get comfortable flights.

Wipe Down Things in Your Space

Consult with the flight attendant to get you a pre-entry. Get to your seat and wipe down the whole area including the armrest, tray table and fabric seats using a wet wipe.

Position Yourself Away from Pets

When booking your ticket, ask the representative to reserve you a seat that’s not near passengers with pets. Although symptoms may not be avoided totally, the severity of the allergy will be minimized.

Place Your Medication strategically

For easy access, place your medication under the seat in front of you. That way, you can just stretch your arm and access it at all times. 

Wear a Scarf and Sunglasses

These will serve to add a level of proofing against allergens. 

Avoid the Provided Pillows and Blankets

You can’t count on cleanliness in airplanes as the blankets and pillows they provide may have been used by passengers with pets. This can trigger severe allergic attacks and therefore, bring your blankets.

Get Allergy Shots before the Trip

If you have a severe allergy to pets, it is wise to get allergy shots in advance. This will give you a level of protection and peace of mind.

If you have an animal allergy, you may be hesitant to travel, especially if you don’t know how to protect yourself. Follow these tips to make your next trip more comfortable by reducing symptoms when traveling with animal allergy.